Dating antique glass bottles

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Although glass bottles have been made for a few thousand years, it was not until the 19th century that bottle use became common, coinciding with the industrial revolution. The earliest bottles were handblown by a glassblower with a blowpipe and lack seams.By the mid-19th century, embossed lettering and marking on bottle bodies and bases, denoting manufacturers and products, made more precise dating possible. Is the bottle highly symmetrical, but lacking mould seams?Some of the larger glass manufacturers made Coke bottles (and other soda bottles such as Pepsi, etc) for of different cities around the United States.The list below is certainly not complete, and I hope to eventually add more information as time allows.In addition to technology, products and manufacturers, certain types of glass colours will also aid in dating. This type of bottle was probably dip-moulded and dates after circa 1820.Is the base indented with an irregular to round pontil scar? Archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History: helps identify historic period ceramics and sherds and learn about specific historic-period ceramic types.

There are many collectors of antique and vintage Coke bottles who try to find examples with various city/town/state embossings marked on the bottom, for instance “LOUISVILLE KY” or “DECATUR ILLS” or “TUCSON ARIZ”.There are pictures of each of the bottles and detailed descriptions with some analysis. Aussie Bottle Digger: This site contains information about antique bottles in Australia. Artifacts from Phillipsburg, Norfolk Island: Examples Chinese export porcelain, English wares, terra cotta; wine and spirit, gin, medicine bottles; decanters & window glass Bank/6559/scc125Smithsonian Institution Website -- Ceramics: 18th c.It has many links that deal with the different ways bottles are dated (color, columns, etc.). Artifacts from Phillipsburg, Norfolk Island: Examples Chinese export porcelain, English wares, terra cotta; wine and spirit, gin, medicine bottles; decanters & window glass Bank/6559/scc125University of South Alabama Archaeology Website: Artifacts of Colonial Mobile: French faience and coarse earthen wares, Spanish colonial majolicas and coarse earthen wares, some Dutch and English delfts, and English colonial coarse earthen wares.It is used mostly for pricing, but also has many pictures and a very helpful glossary of marks and terminology to help date, place, and sometimes see how a bottle was made.Antique Bottles of Baltimore: collection contains bottles from the 1790s onward.

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